Teen kills father, opens fire on schoolyard in South Carolina, authorities say

Harriet McLeod

CHARLESTON, S.C., Sept 28 (Reuters) – A 14-year-old South Carolina boy shot and killed his father then drove to an elementary school playground where he wounded two children and a teacher with a handgun before being tackled by a firefighter who held him for police, authorities said on Wednesday.

The suspect, whose name has not been released, was accused by police of fatally shooting his 47-year-old father, Jeffrey DeWitt Osborne, then driving a pickup truck about 2 miles (3.2 km) to Townville Elementary School where he crashed into a fence surrounding the playground.

After the teenager began shooting, volunteer firefighter Jamie Brock pinned him down while staff led children to safety inside the building, Anderson County emergency services director Taylor Jones told a news conference.

Police arrived within seven minutes of a teacher calling 911 to take the suspect into custody at the school in Anderson County, near the Georgia state line about 100 miles (160 km) northeast of Atlanta. The shooter never entered the building, said Chief Deputy Keith Smith.

Authorities do not know the motivation of the shooting but ruled out race as both the shooter and victims were white.

U.S. schools have taken added security precautions since 2012 when a gunman shot and killed 20 children and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.

Brock, a 30-year veteran of the Townville Volunteer Fire Department, was hailed on social media as a hero and credited with preventing another school massacre.

“(He) was there in the hot scene and risked his life to mitigate this incident,” Jones said. “He just used enough force to take him to the ground.”

One of the victims, 6-year-old Jacob Hall who police say was shot in the leg, remained in critical condition, Greenville Health System spokeswoman Sandy Dees said.

The other boy and a female teacher were treated and released, said Ross Norton, a spokesman for AnMed Health Medical Center. The boy, who local media reported was 6 years old, was shot in the foot and the teacher in the shoulder, authorities said.

SUSPECT CALLED GRANDMOTHER

Anderson County Sheriff’s Office Captain Garland Major told reporters he did not know the relationship between the shooter and those wounded at the school.

Authorities said the suspect was home-schooled and called his grandmother who went to his home and found the boy’s father had been shot.

“She could not make out what he was saying because he was crying and upset and so they went to the house … and that’s when she discovered her son and called 911,” coroner Greg Shore told a news conference on Wednesday night.

Immediately after the shooting, armed officers guarded students as they were evacuated from the school and taken by bus to a nearby church, local media said. Television images showed police swarming the school, with some officers on the roof while others moved around the building.

Jamie Meredith, whose daughter is in kindergarten at Townville Elementary, told WYFF news that she panicked after getting word of the shooting. Her daughter is OK but described a scene of scared and crying children.

“I’m just scared,” Meredith said through tears as she was interviewed by WYFF. “I don’t even want her to go to school now.”

About 280 students attend the school.

The incident was the latest in a series of shootings at U.S. schools that have fueled the debate about access to guns in America.

Earlier this month, a 14-year-old girl shot and wounded a fellow student at a rural Texas high school and then died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley is due to meet with law enforcement officials in the area this evening, Jones said.

(Additional reporting by Colleen Jenkins in Winston-Salem, N.C., Curtis Skinner in San Francisco and Laila Kearney in New York; Writing by Lisa Shumaker; Editing by Andrew Hay and Peter Cooney)

 

Post-debate poll: Hillary Clinton takes round one

Hillary Clinton was deemed the winner of Monday night’s debate by 62% of voters who tuned in to watch, while just 27% said they thought Donald Trump had the better night, according to a CNN/ORC Poll of voters who watched the debate.

That drubbing is similar to Mitt Romney’s dominant performance over President Barack Obama in the first 2012 presidential debate.
Voters who watched said Clinton expressed her views more clearly than Trump and had a better understanding of the issues by a margin of more than 2-to-1. Clinton also was seen as having done a better job addressing concerns voters might have about her potential presidency by a 57% to 35% margin, and as the stronger leader by a 56% to 39% margin.
The gap was smaller on which candidate appeared more sincere and authentic, though still broke in Clinton’s favor, with 53% saying she was more sincere vs. 40% who felt Trump did better on that score. Trump topped Clinton 56% to 33% as the debater who spent more time attacking their opponent.
Although the survey suggested debate watchers were more apt to describe themselves as Democrats than the overall pool of voters, even independents who watched deemed Clinton the winner, 54% vs. 33% who thought Trump did the best job in the debate.
And the survey suggests Clinton outperformed the expectations of those who watched. While pre-debate interviews indicated these watchers expected Clinton to win by a 26-point margin, that grew to 35 points in the post-debate survey.
About half in the poll say the debate did not have an effect on their voting plans, 47% said it didn’t make a difference, but those who say they were moved by it tilted in Clinton’s direction, 34% said the debate made them more apt to vote for Clinton, 18% more likely to back Trump.
On the issues, voters who watched broadly say Clinton would do a better job handling foreign policy, 62% to 35%, and most think she would be the better candidate to handle terrorism, 54% to 43% who prefer Trump. But on the economy, the split is much closer, with 51% saying they favor Clinton’s approach vs. 47% who prefer Trump.
Most debate watchers came away from Monday’s face-off with doubts about Trump’s ability to handle the presidency. Overall, 55% say they didn’t think Trump would be able to handle the job of president, 43% said they thought he would. Among political independents who watched the debate, it’s a near-even split, 50% say he can handle it, 49% that he can’t.
And voters who watched were more apt to see Trump’s attacks on Clinton as unfair than they were to see her critiques that way. About two-thirds of debate viewers, 67%, said Clinton’s critiques of Trump were fair, while just 51% said the same of Trump.
Assessments of Trump’s attacks on Clinton were sharply split by gender, with 58% of men seeing them as fair compared with 44% of women who watched on Monday. There was almost no gender divide in perceptions of whether Clinton’s attacks were fair.
The CNN/ORC post-debate poll includes interviews with 521 registered voters who watched the September 26 debate. Results among debate-watchers have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4.5 percentage points. Respondents were originally interviewed as part of a September 23-25 telephone survey of a random sample of Americans, and indicated they planned to watch the debate and would be willing to be re-interviewed when it was over.
 

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Mayor Barrett: Curfew for teenagers will be more strictly enforced in Milwaukee

 

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WGLB radio  is going to bless our listeners again. This Saturday  WGLB Records  5183 n. 35 will be giving away 2 free state fair tickets to any adult 18 or holder 11:30 to 1pm. listen to WGLB-AM for more details. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

 

Bill Cosby is reportedly ‘blind,’ living in ‘his own personal hell’

Wonderwall.com Editors 

As he waits to find out when he’ll stand trial for three counts of felony aggravated indecent assault, Bill Cosby is reportedly blind and stuck at home without much support besides his wife Camille.

An insider tells the New York Post the comedy icon suffers from an eye disease called keratoconus that’s gotten progressively worse over the past year, during which the number of women claiming he drugged, raped and/or sexually assaulted them has climbed above 50.

“His alleged victims may take some solace in the fact that he’s in his own personal hell,” says the Post’s source. “He has been suffering from a degenerative eye disease and is completely blind … All his Hollywood friends have turned their backs on him.”

The insider went on to say Cosby, now 79, “is confined to his house in Pennsylvania, and the only person on his side is his wife, Camille, who is masterminding his defense,” adding, “His only friends are the small army of lawyers on his payroll.”

While a number of other lawsuits stemming from the alleged sexual assaults are still pending, the “Cosby Show” star is headed to court over Andrea Constand’s 2004 claim he attacked her.

Cosby was recently given a green light to sue Constand — and her mother, her lawyers and the company that owns the National Enquirer — over his claim Constand broke a confidentiality agreement by going public with her allegations against him. He has filed countersuits against a number of the other alleged victims who have filed suit as well.

Cosby’s wife, meanwhile, has remained mostly silent as more and more women have come forward with claims her husband drugged and assaulted them over a period of decades.

“Bill has humiliated [Camille],” an insider told the Post in January, “and the affairs he’s had have gotten out of hand and this [criminal charge] is him reaping what he’s sown.”

Though he’s repeatedly denied the accusations against him, he did admit in a deposition taken in 2005 and 2006 to using drugs and his celebrity status to have sex with women.

 

5 Dallas Officers Slain, Deadliest Day for Police Since 9/11

Five Dallas police officers were fatally shot and seven others wounded during a protest over the deaths of black men killed by police this week in Louisiana and Minnesota — the deadliest day for U.S. law enforcement since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Police Chief David Brown blamed “snipers,” but it was unclear how many shooters were involved. Authorities initially said three suspects were in custody and a fourth dead, killed by a robot-delivered bomb in a parking garage where he had exchanged fire with officers.

Before dying, the police chief said, the suspect told officers he was upset about recent shootings and wanted to kill whites, “especially white officers.” The man also stated that he acted alone and was not affiliated with any groups, Brown said.

Thursday’s bloodshed, which unfolded just a few blocks from where President John F. Kennedy was slain in 1963, also evoked the trauma of the nation’s tumultuous civil rights era.

The shooting began about 8:45 p.m. Thursday while hundreds of people were gathered to protest the killings in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and suburban St. Paul, Minnesota. Brown told reporters that snipers fired “ambush-style” on the officers. Two civilians also were wounded.

Police were not sure they had located all possible suspects, but by attention on Friday quickly focused on the man killed in the parking garage.

Authorities resorted to the bomb after hours of negotiations failed, Brown said. The suspect said he was not affiliated with any groups and stated that he acted alone, Brown added.

A Texas law enforcement official identified the slain suspect as Micah Johnson, 25.

The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because he said he was not authorized to release the information. There were no immediate details on the suspect’s middle name or hometown.

None of the suspects was identified, and the police chief said he would not disclose any details about them until authorities were sure everyone involved was in custody.

The shooting began about 8:45 p.m. Thursday while hundreds of people were gathered to protest the week’s fatal police shootings in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and suburban St. Paul, Minnesota. Brown told reporters the snipers fired “ambush-style” on the officers. Two civilians were also wounded.

Brown said it appeared the shooters “planned to injure and kill as many officers as they could.”

Video from the scene showed protesters marching along a downtown street about half a mile from City Hall when shots erupted and the crowd scattered, seeking cover. Officers crouched beside vehicles, armored SWAT team vehicles arrived and a helicopter hovered overhead.

Demonstrations were held in several other U.S. cities Thursday night to protest the police killings of two more black men: A Minnesota officer on Wednesday fatally shot Philando Castile while he was in a car with a woman and a child, and the shooting’s aftermath was livestreamed in a widely shared Facebook video. A day earlier, Alton Sterling was shot in Louisiana after being pinned to the pavement by two white officers. That, too, was captured on a cellphone video.

The Dallas shootings occurred in an area of hotels, restaurants, businesses and some residential apartments only a few blocks from Dealey Plaza, the landmark made famous by the Kennedy assassination.

The scene was chaotic, with officers with automatic rifles on the street corners.

“Everyone just started running,” Devante Odom, 21, told The Dallas Morning News. “We lost touch with two of our friends just trying to get out of there.”

Carlos Harris, who lives downtown, told the newspaper that the shooters “were strategic. It was tap, tap, pause. Tap, tap, pause,” he said.

Brown said the suspects “triangulated” in the downtown area where the protesters were marching and had “some knowledge of the route” they would take.

Video posted on social media appeared to show a gunman at ground level exchanging fire with a police officer who was then felled.

Mayor Mike Rawlings said one of wounded officers had a bullet go through his leg as three members of his squad were fatally shot around him.

“He felt that people don’t understand the danger of dealing with a protest,” said Rawlings, who spoke to the surviving officer. “And that’s what I learned from this. We care so much about people protesting, and I think it’s their rights. But how we handle it can do a lot of things. One of the things it can do is put our police officers in harm’s way, and we have to be very careful about doing that.”

Early Friday morning, dozens of officers filled the corridor of the emergency room at Baylor Medical Center, where other wounded officers were taken. The mayor and police chief were seen arriving there.

Four of the officers who were killed were with the Dallas Police Department, a spokesman said. One was a Dallas Area Rapid Transit officer. The agency said in a statement that 43-year-old officer Brent Thompson, a newlywed whose bride also works for the police force, was the first officer killed in the line of duty since the agency formed a police department in 1989.

“Our hearts are broken,” the statement said.

Theresa Williams said one of the wounded civilians was her sister, 37-year-old Shetamia Taylor, who was shot in the right calf. She had thrown herself over her four sons, ages 12 to 17, when the shooting began.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott directed the Texas Department of Public Safety to offer “whatever assistance the City of Dallas needs.”

“In times like this we must remember — and emphasize — the importance of uniting as Americans,” Abbott said.

Other protests across the U.S. on Thursday were peaceful, including in New York, Atlanta, Chicago and Philadelphia. In Minnesota, where Castile was shot, hundreds of protesters marched in the rain from a vigil to the governor’s official residence.

President Barack Obama said America is “horrified” by the shootings, which have no possible justification. He called them “vicious, calculated and despicable.”

Speaking from Warsaw, Poland, where he was meeting with leaders of the European Union and attending a NATO summit, the president asked all Americans to pray for the fallen officers and their families.

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, which tracks on-duty deaths, said the fatal shootings made Thursday the deadliest day for U.S. police since Sept. 11.

 

SAY GOOD BYE TO TIME WARNER CABLE

Charter has completed its purchase of Time Warner Cable, combining the two companies and forming the United States’ second largest cable operator, just behind Comcast. Charter also completed its acquisition of the smaller cable provider Bright House Networks. With the three companies combined, Charter now serves over 25 million customers in 41 states.

The acquisition ultimately had Charter paying $55 billion for Time Warner Cable and $10.4 billion for Bright House Networks, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Charter claims the acquisition will allow it to improve its broadband network throughout the country, leading to faster speeds and better video products.

The Time Warner Cable name is going away

This is also the beginning of the end for Time Warner Cable. Though the brand still exists today, Charter tells Bloomberg that the name will be phased out. “While Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks customers will not see any immediate change, the company will be called Charter and the products and services will be marketed under the ‘Spectrum’ brand,” a representative said. It’s a PR move, meant to counter the fact that Time Warner Cable customers don’t have a very bright view of Time Warner Cable.

Charter announced its intention to purchase Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks a year ago next week. In the time between then and now, regulators investigated whether the deal would harm consumers and competition. Ultimately they decided it wouldn’t — for the most part, at least. The FCC and Justice Department mandated that the new Charter agree to seven years worth of conditions.

Those conditions prevent Charter from imposing data caps or usage-based pricing, from charging interconnect fees to heavy data users like Netflix, and from making TV exclusivity deals that would harm online video providers. The data caps rule is huge for consumers, as Comcast now appears to be moving in that direction for all customers; but taken together, all three rules are meant to ensure that Charter, which offers both internet and TV service, doesn’t prevent online TV services from competing

 

by: Jacob Kastrenakes and Hollywood reporter

 

President Obama reveals retirement plans

 

Nancy Reagan, former first lady and actress, dead at 94

(CNN)Former first lady Nancy Reagan, who joined her husband on a storybook journey from Hollywood to the White House, died Sunday.

She was 94.

Reagan died at her home in Los Angeles of congestive heart failure, according to her spokeswoman, Joanne Drake of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.

“Mrs. Reagan will be buried at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California, next to her husband, Ronald Wilson Reagan, who died on June 5, 2004. Prior to the funeral service, there will be an opportunity for members of the public to pay their respects at the library,” Drake said in a statement.

The former first lady requested that contributions be made to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Foundation in lieu of flowers, the statement said.

 

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